~shunter/tagmage

Save, organize, and list files via tags.
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#tagmage

Save, organize, and list files via tags.

Note: This project is still immature, so expect breaking changes between major versions and in the master branch!

#Table of Contents

#Installation

To install, download the latest release. Edit config.mk to your tastes, install the required dependencies and compile:

$ sudo apt-get install libsqlite3-dev libbsd-dev
$ make
$ sudo make install

#Usage

Usage: tagmage [ -f PATH ] COMMAND [ ... ]

  -f SAVE  - Set custom save directory.

  add [-t TAG1 TAG2 ... +] FILES..
  edit FILE TITLE
  list [TAGS..]
  untagged
  tag FILE [TAGS..]
  untag IFLE [TAGS..]
  tags FILE
  path [FILES..]
  rm FILES..

Visit `man 1 tagmage` for more details.

The frontend utility tad also has its own manpage.

#Quickstart

We'll be working with tagmage to save and manage files, and tad to list them.

We have several images in ~ named a.png, b.png, ..., g.png. Let's add a.png to the database:

$ tagmage add a.png
1

The image is now copied to $XDG_DATA_HOME/tagmage, and we received the id of our new image. To get the path of where the image is located:

$ tagmage path 1
/home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/1.png

Listing all the images, we see:

$ tagmage list
1 a.png

A database with one file and no tags isn't much of a database, though. Let's add the rest:

$ tagmage add -t foo bar + b.png
2
$ tagmage add -t bar qux + {c..g}.png
3
4
5
6
7

Not only can we tag an image the same line that we add it to the database, but we can also add multiple images with the same tags on the same line. Now that we have tags, we can now list all tags that we have, and also list the tags that a single image has:

$ tagmage tags
foo
bar
qux
$ tagmage tags 3
bar
qux

We can also list all files that only have certain tags:

$ tagmage list foo
2 b.png
$ tagmage list bar qux
3 c.png
4 d.png
5 e.png
6 f.png
7 g.png

To add or remove tags to existing files:

$ tagmage tag 2 bux
$ tagmage tags 2
foo
bar
bux
$ tagmage untag 2 bux
foo
bar

To rename an existing file:

$ tagmage edit 2 an_image.png
$ tagmage list foo
2 an_image.png

#Using Tad

These utilities are useful for a frontend, but not that exciting if you want to view your images in bulk. Let's use tad to create a directory full of files linked to the database:

$ tad list

By default, tad created a directory at /tmp/tad-$USER:

$ ls /tmp/tad-$USER
00001-a.png
00002-animage.png
00003-c.png
00004-d.png
00005-e.png
00006-e.png
00007-e.png
$ readlink /tmp/tad-$USER/00001-a.png
/home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/1

We can filter by tags the same way:

$ tad list foo
$ ls /tmp/tad-$USER
00002-an_image.png
$ tad list bar qux
$ ls /tmp/tad-$USER
00003-c.png
00004-d.png
00005-e.png
00006-f.png
00007-g.png

Common utilities found in tagmage have their own version in tad as well:

$ tad list && cd /tmp/tad-$USER
$ tad edit 00002-an_image.png b # The file is now renamed at this point.
$ readlink 00002-b.png
/home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/2
$ tad tag 00002-b.png qux
$ tad untag 00002-b.png qux
$ tad rm 00003-c.png
$ # The symlink should be automatically removed.
$ ls 00003-c.png
ls: cannot access '00003-c.png': No such file or directory.

Note that if you delete the file with rm, and not tad rm or tagmage rm, the changes will not be reflected in the database, and will appear again next time you list images.

You are also able to list images a separate way:

$ tad tags
$ tree /tmp/tad-$USER
/tmp/tad-$USER
├── foo
│   └── 00002-b.png -> /home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/2
├── bar
│   ├── 00002-b.png -> /home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/2
│   ├── 00003-c.png -> /home/$USER/.local/share/tagmage/3
# ...and so on.

If you call tad tags without any other arguments, it will also create a folder called :untagged that lists all files without any tags.

This directory tree is easier to look at with the human eye, but others may prefer tad list, or it might be easier to run a script in the simpler directory tree.